ENVIRONMENT

Posts in "Environment"

Solar Power and Honey Bees Make a Sweet Combo in Minnesota

Last year, when Minnesota passed a groundbreaking law on best practices for providing pollinator habitat at solar power sites, they also (unexpectedly) helped launch something called Solar Honey, in which solar companies and commercial beekeepers work together in a mutually beneficial arrangement.

Link: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/solar-power-and-honey-bees-180964743/

The Last Death-Defying Honey Hunter of Nepal

Three hundred feet in the air, Mauli Dhan dangles on a bamboo rope ladder, surveying the section of granite he must climb to reach his goal: a pulsing mass of thousands of Himalayan giant honeybees. They carpet a crescent-shaped hive stretching almost six feet below a granite overhang. The bees are guarding gallons of a sticky, reddish fluid known as mad honey, which, thanks to its hallucinogenic properties, sells on Asian black markets for $60 to $80 a pound—roughly six times the price of regular Nepali honey.

Link: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/07/honey-hunters-bees-climbing-nepal/

How Mushrooms Could Repair Our Crumbling Infrastructure

The U.S. has one of the most advanced economies in the world. And yet the concrete infrastructure that supports it—the roads, bridges, sidewalks, and so on—is slowly crumbling. This deterioration requires complex repairs, causes long delays, and in the most severe cases can lead to structural failure.

Link: https://www.technologyreview.com/s/608717/how-mushrooms-could-repair-our-crumbling-infrastructure/

In the dirt with Ron Finley, the Gangsta Gardener

Ron Finley is standing in the deep end of an Olympic-sized swimming pool. The pool is empty, has been empty for years, the water long ago replaced by an elaborate garden. The garden overflows the geometry of the pool, growing up the sides, in and out of buckets and boxes and pails, around brightly painted artwork and a mural painted by one of Finley’s three grown sons, two of whom are artists.

Link: https://www.latimes.com/food/dailydish/la-fo-ron-finley-project-20170503-story.html

New Study Shows Organic Farming Traps Carbon in Soil to Combat Climate Change

When it comes to mitigating the worst impacts of climate change, keeping excess carbon out of the atmosphere is the prime target for improving the health of our planet. One of the best ways to do that is thought to be locking more of that carbon into the soil that grows our food.

Link: http://civileats.com/2017/09/11/new-study-shows-organic-farming-traps-carbon-in-soil-to-combat-climate-change/

Good Samaritans save stranded manatees from Irma

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Two manatees were stranded after Hurricane Irma sucked the water out of Sarasota Bay, in Florida’s Manatee County.

Several people posted photos of the mammals on Facebook Sunday, hoping rescue workers or wildlife officials would respond. Michael Sechler posted that the animals were far too massive to be lifted, so they gave them water.

Link: https://nypost.com/2017/09/10/good-samaritans-save-stranded-manatees-from-irma/

A juice company dumped orange peels in a national park. Here’s what it looks like now.

In exchange for donating a portion of unspoiled, forested land to the Área de Conservación Guanacaste — a nature preserve in the country’s northwest — the park would allow the company to dump its discarded orange peels and pulp, free of charge, in a heavily grazed, largely deforested area nearby.

https://www.upworthy.com/a-juice-company-dumped-orange-peels-in-a-national-park-heres-what-it-looks-like-now

Scientists Find Record 2.7-Million-Year-Old Ice Core in Antarctica

Back in 2010, a group of scientists drilling in Antarctica pulled up a one-million-year-old chunk of ice. At the time, it was the oldest ice core ever discovered. But as Paul Voosen reports for Sciencethe team recently dug even deeper into Earth’s glacial history, unearthing an ice core that dates back 2.7 million years.  

https://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news/scientists-find-27-million-year-old-ice-core-antarctica-180964566/

Trees with “Crown Shyness” Mysteriously Avoid Touching Each Other

If you look up toward certain types of towering trees—including eucalyptus, Sitka spruce, and Japanese larch—you may notice a unique phenomenon: the uppermost branches don’t touch. Known as “crown shyness,” this natural occurrence results in rupture-like patterns in the forest canopy that seem to perfectly outline the trees’ striking silhouettes.

https://mymodernmet.com/crown-shyness-trees-phenomenon/

A Butterfly Reappears in Scotland After 133 Years Away

LAST WEDNESDAY, IAN COWE TOOK a photograph of a white-letter hairstreak in Scotland—the first time since 1884 the butterfly had been seen in the country. The butterfly, he told the BBC, was “a very ragged and worn individual found feeding on ragwort in the grassy edge of an arable field.”

https://www.atlasobscura.com/articles/butterfly-scotland-136-years-hairstreak?utm_source=twitter&utm_medium=atlas-page