EDUCATION

Posts in "Education"

Pets Are Good For Us—But Not In The Ways We Think They Are

John Bradshaw and his colleagues had to invent a new word—and the new field of “anthrozoology”—to describe their work studying the interactions between animals and humans. In his new book, The Animals Among Us, Bradshaw now demolishes a few myths about the pets that increasingly crowd our homes. [Find out if your dog would eat you if you died.]

Link:https://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/11/pets-animals-john-bradshaw/

Meet the Oldest Living U.S. Veteran

For his first 107 years, Richard Overton lived in relative anonymity. A World War II veteran who fought in the Pacific, he could usually be found post-retirement on the porch of his Austin, Texas, home, smoking cigars and chatting up his extensive circle of family and friends. Then, in 2013, he visited Washington, D.C., and was referred to in the media as the oldest living U.S. veteran. (In actuality, that would not become true until 2016.)

Link: https://www.history.com/news/meet-the-oldest-living-u-s-veteran

Dallas Tries Drop-In Programs for Low-Income Students

Texans in Dallas are trying something different when it comes to addressing homelessness among students.

About 3,600 students are homeless, according to data from the Dallas Independent School District, and 90 percent are “economically disadvantaged.” Texas has the third highest number of homeless students in the nation.

Link: https://www.wnyc.org/story/dallas-tries-drop-programs-low-income-students/

An Alternative View of Human Nature: Rebecca Solnit on Disaster as a Catalyst for Dignity, Agency, and Human Goodness

In his diary of moral development, young Tolstoy proclaimed: “This is the entire essence of life: Who are you? What are you?” The part left unspoken, perhaps because it is often unspeakable, is that there is no solid self to give a constant answer —

Link:https://www.brainpickings.org/2017/10/16/rebecca-solnit-disaster/

Discover the Jacobean Traveling Library: The 17th Century Precursor to the Kindle

In the striking image above, you can see an early experiment in making books portable–a 17th century precursor, if you will, to the modern day Kindle.

According to the library at the University of Leeds, this “Jacobean Travelling Library” dates back to 1617. That’s when William Hakewill, an English lawyer and MP, commissioned the miniature library–a big book, which itself holds 50 smaller books, all “bound in limp vellum covers with coloured fabric ties.”

Link: http://www.openculture.com/2017/08/discover-the-jacobean-traveling-library-the-17th-century-precursor-to-the-kindle.html

‘Star Trek’ Moves Into the Weird, Real Frontier of Space Mushrooms

In Star Trek: Discovery, astromycologist Lieutenant Paul Stamets, the resident expert on space mushrooms, reveals that the entire Star Trek universe revolves around an unexpected life form: spores. In the third episode, Stamets uses the science of fungi to argue that there’s no difference between physics and biology at the quantum level, explaining that spores are the “pro-generators of panspermia” and the “building blocks of energy across the universe.”

Link: https://www.inverse.com/article/37061-star-trek-discovery-stamets-mycology

Why Are Finland’s Schools Successful?

It was the end of term at Kirkkojarvi Comprehensive School in Espoo, a sprawling suburb west of Helsinki, when Kari Louhivuori, a veteran teacher and the school’s principal, decided to try something extreme—by Finnish standards. One of his sixth-grade students, a Kosovo-Albanian boy, had drifted far off the learning grid, resisting his teacher’s best efforts. The school’s team of special educators—including a social worker, a nurse and a psychologist—convinced Louhivuori that laziness was not to blame. So he decided to hold the boy back a year, a measure so rare in Finland it’s practically obsolete.

Link: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/innovation/why-are-finlands-schools-successful-49859555/?utm_source=twitter.com&utm_medium=socialmedia

Plastic-degrading fungus found in Pakistan rubbish dump

Scientists believe they may have discovered one solution to the planet’s growing level of plastic waste in the form of a plastic-eating fungus.

Researchers who set out to find a naturally occurring means of degrading waste plastic safely, extracted samples from a rubbish dump outside Islamabad in Pakistan and found a soil fungus that was feeding on plastic.

Link: https://www.independent.co.uk/environment/plastic-degrading-fungus-pakistan-rubbish-dump-islamabad-dr-sehroon-khan-a7962046.html

I’m dyslexic and I’m on the verge of tears because of this goofy, long overdue font

Like a lot of you, books were really important to me growing up. They were a way to escape, they were my friends when I had none, and they were windows into other worlds that I dreamed I could be a part of someday.

Books sheltered me, raised me, and showed me that I wasn’t alone. But they were also really difficult for me — because I have dyslexia.

Link: https://www.revelist.com/wellness/dyslexia-font/4916/default/1