Discover the Jacobean Traveling Library: The 17th Century Precursor to the Kindle

In the striking image above, you can see an early experiment in making books portable–a 17th century precursor, if you will, to the modern day Kindle.

According to the library at the University of Leeds, this “Jacobean Travelling Library” dates back to 1617. That’s when William Hakewill, an English lawyer and MP, commissioned the miniature library–a big book, which itself holds 50 smaller books, all “bound in limp vellum covers with coloured fabric ties.”

Link: http://www.openculture.com/2017/08/discover-the-jacobean-traveling-library-the-17th-century-precursor-to-the-kindle.html

In search of the ninth planet

A University of Michigan doctoral student has logged two pieces of evidence that may support the existence of a planet that could be part of our solar system, beyond Neptune.

Some astronomers think this alleged planet, called Planet Nine, exists because of the way some objects in space, called “Trans-Neptunian Objects,” or TNOs, behave. These TNOs are rocky objects smaller than Pluto that orbit the sun at a greater average distance than Neptune.

Link: https://phys.org/news/2017-10-ninth-planet.html

United States: Philosophy class examines universal Basic Income whose time has come

A Stanford University class –available on a podcast replays the 1970s Manitoba, Canada, experiment called “mincome,” on the way to rejoicing in Universal Basic Income.

In the U.S., Silicon Valley entrepreneurs like Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook, who according to some is preparing to run for U.S. President, are promoting universal basic income.

Link: https://basicincome.org/news/2017/09/united-states-philosophy-class-examines-universal-basic-income-whose-time-come/

Astronomers just proved the incredible origin of nearly all gold, platinum, and silver in the universe

Platinum and gold are among the most precious substances on Earth, each fetching roughly $1,000 an ounce.

However, their allure may grow stronger — and weirder — thanks to a groundbreaking new finding about their violent, radioactive, and cosmic origins.

Link: https://www.businessinsider.com/neutron-stars-crash-ligo-gravitational-waves-periodic-elements-2017-10

Frida, the bravest rescue dog, has been immortalised in a mural

When Mexico suffered a devasting earthquake a few weeks ago, Frida the hero dog was there to pull people from the rubble. In fact, she rescued 53 people, including 12 in life-threatening situations. So it’s only good and right that she’s finally been given some recognition. Frida the bravest and most loyal labrador has been honoured with her very own mural in Mexico City, complete with doggy goggles and a Navy-issue rescue vest.

Link:https://metro.co.uk/2017/10/12/frida-the-bravest-rescue-dog-has-been-immortalised-in-a-mural-6995222/

Barcelona’s African street traders swap crime for craft

BARCELONA (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – When Alioune Thiam arrived in Barcelona, he joined hundreds of other undocumented African migrants peddling their wares illegally on the streets. Now he’s part of a scheme to give some of the Spanish city’s most vulnerable people an alternative.

Link: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-spain-migrants-unemployment/barcelonas-african-street-traders-swap-crime-for-craft-idUSKBN1CH1CD

Plastic-eating caterpillars could save the planet

MOST scientific research follows a logical progression, with one experiment following up on the findings of another. Every now and then, however, serendipity plays a part. Such is the case with a paper just published in Current Biology, which reveals to the world a moth capable of chewing up plastic.

Link: https://www.economist.com/science-and-technology/2017/04/29/plastic-eating-caterpillars-could-save-the-planet?fsrc=scn%2Ftw%2Fte%2Fbl%2Fed%2F

Superbugs may meet their match in these nanoparticles

Antibiotics may have a new teammate in the fight against drug-resistant infections.

Researchers have engineered nanoparticles to produce chemicals that render bacteria more vulnerable to antibiotics. These quantum dots, described online October 4 in Science Advances, could help combat pathogens that have developed resistance to antibiotics (SN: 10/15/16, p. 11).

Link: https://www.sciencenews.org/article/superbugs-may-meet-their-match-these-nanoparticles

A Fitbit for the Stomach

We admit to a weird fascination with electronics that can be swallowed. Whether its robots, cameras, or edible actuators, we find them James Bond-level cool.

So here’s another one for you: A flexible sensor developed at MIT and Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston can monitor movements in the stomach, sense ingestion, and power itself for at least two days without degrading

Link: https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-human-os/biomedical/devices/fitbit-for-the-stomach

Meet the Disabled Veteran Who Prototypes Prosthetics for Cats

One of the most beautiful aspects of the Maker Movement is how inclusive it is. Anyone can be a maker, and everyone is encouraged to find the maker within. Highly skilled combat veteran Karolyn Smith never considered herself a maker. Having returned home from her deployments with multiple debilitating injuries and PTSD, she found herself heavily medicated and losing hope, with no real solutions in sight.

Link: https://makezine.com/2017/10/04/meet-disabled-veteran-who-prototypes-prosthetics-cats/